Giving up on careers advice*

If something is important, but not possible, should schools try to do it anyway? There is no better example of a thing-that-can’t-be-done than careers education. The argument for careers education seems compelling: many students (particularly from disadvantaged backgrounds) don’t know what jobs are out there, therefore careers advice is important. Nearly every adult you meet …

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Don’t let ‘perfect’ become the enemy of ‘better’ in the revision of accountability metrics

Last week, Ed Dorrell wrote a strange editorial in TES called ‘Why attaching excluded pupils' results to their school won't work'. I say it was strange because he failed to address the major impediment to including off-rolled pupils in accountability metrics (i.e. finding them... for that, read on). There is no doubt that there are …

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Writing the rules of the grading game (part III): There is no value-neutral approach to giving feedback

These three blogs (part I, part II, part III here) are based on a talk I gave at Headteachers' Roundtable Summit in March 2019. My thoughts on this topic have been extensively shaped by conversations with Ben White, a psychology teacher in Kent. Neither of us yet know what we think! Our beliefs about our …

Continue reading Writing the rules of the grading game (part III): There is no value-neutral approach to giving feedback

Writing the rules of the grading game (part II): The games children play

These three blogs (part I, part II here, part III) are based on a talk I gave at Headteachers' Roundtable Summit in March 2019. My thoughts on this topic have been extensively shaped by conversations with Ben White, a psychology teacher in Kent. Neither of us yet know what we think! The two fundamental jobs …

Continue reading Writing the rules of the grading game (part II): The games children play